Hospitalization rates drop in COVID-19 county after states issue mask mandates

State mask mandates have been associated with reduced hospitalization rates for COVID-19 across the United States during the early phase of the pandemic. As new variants of SARS-CoV-2 cause spikes in cases of COVID-19, re-imposing mask mandates in indoor and crowded public spaces, as part of a multi-layered approach to community mitigation, may reduce the spread of COVID-19 and reduce the burden on the health care system we’ve got.

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended a combination of Evidence-Based Strategies To reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2 virus. Given that the virus is mostly spread by inhalation of aerosol droplets or aerosol particles from infected individuals, one of the recommended preventive measures was to wear a universal mask. Following the CDC’s guidance, many states have begun issuing mask mandates to slow the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in 2020.

Research has demonstrated that these mask mandates have been associated with a decrease in Growth rates of COVID-19 cases and deaths. One of our recently published studies showed an association between mask authorizations and High levels of consumer spending After states reopened, average biweekly consumer spending increased to $4.46 million in counties with state mask mandates. And while some studies have shown the benefits of using a mask in the hospital in… certain countries, little is known regarding its impact on COVID-19-related hospitalization in all states that have issued mask mandates. Understanding this association is important in the context of COVID-19, as it is well documented that the first part of the epidemic It caused capacity problems in hospitals across the United States. Intensive care units (ICUs) had to balance admissions of patients with COVID-19 and patients without COVID-19, which resulted in Lack of space for patients who need intensive care. This may be one of the reasons for the high death rate caused by other prevalent diseases since the beginning of the epidemic.

In our article, “Association between state mask authorizations and hospitalization rates in a COVID-19 county, we found that implementing state-issued mask mandates was also associated with a reduction in COVID-19 hospital admissions in the first year of the pandemic. Specifically, state mask mandates were associated with an average of 3.6 fewer daily COVID-19 hospitalizations per 100,000 people and a 1.2 percentage point decrease in the percentage of county beds occupied by COVID-19 patients, 70 days after the state’s effective date. In other words, across states that issued mask mandates in 2020, at least 9,071 hospitalizations of the novel coronavirus may have been averted within two months of those states going into effect.

These findings demonstrate that state mask mandates may have helped reduce the burden of COVID-19 on the healthcare sector by avoiding COVID-19 hospitalization. This is particularly important because it suggests that mask mandates may have helped “flatten the curve,” allowing intensive care units to care for both patients diagnosed with COVID-19 and patients with other serious diagnoses. The decline in COVID-19 acceptance may also lead to more favorable economic outcomes for insurers and patients Preventing costly hospitalization.

Furthermore, we found that this decrease in COVID-19 hospitalizations associated with mask mandates became larger over time, This suggests that these policies were more effective once individuals had time to modify their behavior and develop social norms. This can also be explained by the reductions in secondary transmissions after mask delegations.

As new variants of SARS-CoV-2 cause mutations in cases of COVID-19, re-imposing mask mandates in indoor and crowded public spaces as part of a multi-layered approach to community mitigation may reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2 and reduce the burden on the care system Our health. Public health officials may wish to consider referring to CDC COVID-19 Community Level Dashboard To obtain current information on both their community’s COVID-19 hospitalizations and potential stresses on their local health systems when making decisions about re-implementing community prevention strategies.

For more information, read our article here:


Christopher Dunphy, Ph.D., An economist in the Injury Prevention Division at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). His work involves the application of quasi-experimental research designs to assess the public health and economic effects of state and federal policies. Dr. Dunphy holds a Ph.D. in applied economics from The Ohio State University.

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Hiso Jo, Ph.D., He is an economist in the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She evaluated public health programs and interventions and conducted organizational impact analyzes. Dr. Joe received her Ph.D. in Economics from the State University of New York at Albany.

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Matthew R.P. Sapiano, Ph.D., He is the Director of Data Science at Lantana Consulting Group and supports the CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network as a chief statistician.

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Mara Howard Williams, J.D., He is the former head of the CDC’s Mitigation Policy Analysis Unit. Legal epidemiology is used to examine how the law affects public health across the United States. Prior to joining the CDC, she focused on the role of culture in global health, recognition and adherence to international human rights instruments and the promotion of health as a human right. It has also helped global nonprofit organizations increase their efforts through strategic program planning and evaluation.

Russell F McCord, J.D., Public Health Analyst in the Bureau of Population Health and Policy Analytics (formerly with PHLP). His work includes facilitating epi legal work with internal and external partners and providing expert expertise on legal and policy issues across various public health topics.

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Gregory Sunshine, JD, He works as a public health analyst with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Public Health Law Program at the Center for State, Tribal, Local, and Regional Support. Oversees research on emergency declarations, isolation and quarantine, medical countermeasures, and legal preparedness competencies. He holds a Juris Doctor from the University of Maryland School of Law and a BA in Political Science from Dickinson College.

Szu-Yu (Zoe) Kao, Ph.D., Prevention Efficacy Fellow at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Her work focuses on evaluating health policies and technologies in both chronic and infectious diseases using an analytical framework for decisions to improve the health of populations and patients.

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Jerry Jay, Ph.D., MPH, He is a lead health scientist in the CDC’s Division of Overdose Prevention. His work focuses on research and applied evaluation in the prevention of drug overdose. Jerry holds a master’s degree in public health in health policy and a doctorate in health services research and health policy from Emory University.

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Regine Webber, JD, MPH, Attorney based in Dallas, Texas. She holds a Ph.D. and Masters in Public Health from Case Western Reserve University and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Maxim Jach, JD, MPH, Associate Professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) School of Public Health and Associate Director of the New NLV University Health Law Program. His research, teaching, and service center on the intersection of law, policy, and public health.

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Donatus U Ekweemi, Ph.D., He is the chief economist for the CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. His work uses applied economic principles and methods to evaluate public health intervention programs and policies, and to guide decisions about the most effective and efficient ways to allocate health resources to maximize population health.

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